New artist statement

Having read the pointers from the Lensculture reviewer, I have now tweaked my artist statement for Harena Now so that it will be the same across all mediums.

On my website it previously read:

Harena Now investigates the global sand crisis through the use of alternative photographic processes.

It aims to spark discussions about this lesser known environmental issue that is having dire consequences not only on the environment but human life too.

Some experts predict that due to the booming demand for sand in industries such as construction, sand may run out. That seems impossible for such a ubiquitous material.

It also seems unimaginable that this has also led to a growth in sand mafias, and that people have lost their homes, livelihoods and even their lives.

To create my non-documentary images, I work at a coastal location, using sand, sunlight and sometimes seawater.

It is also important to me that I work in a way that minimises my own photographic footprint and I have opted to use camera-less processes that need minimal or no chemical solutions.

By creating juxtaposition between the aesthetic and the meaning I hope to discover more about how people respond to non-documentary photography when used to promote environmental and/or humanitarian issues.

These images meld various sources of inspiration from the passage of time to geology, the microscopic to the vast, anthropocentric to ecocentric ideologies, and the past to the present.

I have now amended it to read:

Harena Now investigates the global sand crisis through the use of alternative photographic processes.

It is part of my wider interest in how humans impact on the world in which we live.

My motivation for this work is two-fold. Firstly, I aim to raise the profile of this lesser known environmental issue that is having dire consequences not only on eco-systems but human life too, and secondly, I want to investigate how the use of non-documentary photography when used to promote environmental and/or humanitarian issues can influence action.

Some experts predict that due to the booming demand for sand in industries such as construction, fracking and beach re-nourishment, sand may run out. That seems impossible for such a ubiquitous material.

It also seems unimaginable that this has also led to a growth in sand mafias, and that people have lost their homes, livelihoods and even their lives.

To minimise my own photographic footprint, I have opted to use camera-less processes that need minimal or no chemical solutions, creating my abstract images at coastal locations, using sand, sunlight and sometimes seawater.

Harena is the Latin word for sand. It also symbolises sandy places such as the seashore but also an arena/place of contest. As the developing environmental/humanitarian issues surrounding our use of sand is most definitely a battle, for those trying to survive and make a living, for the wildlife and habitats caught up in the process, for those trying to determine a solution, it is apt that Harena signifies the material (sand) and implies conflict. 

The Harena Now images meld various sources of inspiration from the passage of time to geology, the microscopic to the vast, anthropocentric to ecocentric ideologies, and the past to the present.

For me, the two main motivators are linked; I can’t say one is more important than the other. But I do think this latter version succinctly addresses why I have created this work.

References

Harena meaning. Available at: http://www.latin-dictionary.net/definition/21895/harena-harenae [accessed July 24, 2018].

Arena meaning: Available at: http://www.vroma.org/~bmcmanus/arena.html [accessed July 24, 2018].